[Grantees] 2016 Teen Intern Grantee Space

This space is intended for the 2016 Teen  Summer Intern grantees.

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Hi Diane. What a beautiful library you run in Dryden! Well since our annual Teen Summer Volunteer program is already of high interest to teens, we have chosen to implement a selective recruitment process for our intern positions. While our teen interns will be selected from the large pool of general applicants, we have a few added requirements for our intern positions. Ideally, we ask that our intern candidates have previous volunteer experience with the library, as well as a staff recommendation. If those requirements are met, we ask interested teens to fill out a brief application. From there, eligible candidates are contacted for a professional interview. Selection is then determined by a team of two Teen Services Librarians and the Teen Services Coordinator. I realize this may work differently if your library system is smaller, so please feel free to ask additional questions. Glad we connected :)

Hello! My name is Lindsey Tomsu, and I am the Teen Librarian at the La Vista Public Library in La Vista, Nebraska. While this is my first year receiving the intern grant, this will be the fourth summer of my Teen Advisory Board Teen Internship program. You might have read a bit about it in our article in School Library Journal this past November. http://www.slj.com/2015/11/teens-ya/a-model-internship-program/#_

My program is a TAB-member incentive. It is created as a college-level, 10-week true to life internship that they can put on their scholarship, NHS, college and job applications as real-life practical experience. My library shares a building with a location of Metro Community College and their president is so nice to give us a classroom to use each summer for the internship. The internship itself is broken up into eight units of materials over the ten weeks:

(1)   Introduction to Libraries and Librarianship

(2)   Programming

(3)   Circulation

(4)   Reference

(5)   Collection Development

(6)   Teen Services

(7)   Miscellaneous

(8)   Their Future as a Librarian

Once interns have been selected, they receive an official offer letter in the mail. Their parents read over the expectations of the internship and sign their approval. The interns then receive their “workbook” of materials, which includes a work schedule, an internship expectations guideline sheet, and their unit-by-unit collection of materials (a calendar with due dates, copies of their readings, and assignment packets). The interns meet every Tuesday and Thursday at 8 a.m. Just like a responsible employee they have to “clock in” and be on time. Until 12 p.m. the teens listen to lectures (with presentations), conduct lively discussions, discuss readings they were to complete before class, and complete in-classroom assignments. From 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., the interns break for lunch. From 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., we prep for the afternoon teen program, which then runs from 3:30 until 4:30/5 p.m. We then clean up and the interns break for dinner. At 6 p.m. we begin our evening program. The interns then help clean up that program and leave around 8 p.m.

Over the past three years, I have had seven graduates, both boys and girls, ranging from age 13 to 22. One of the biggest responsibilities the interns do is our Guilty Pleasures Night, which is usually in July. They have to brainstorm, plan, budget, shop, and run the teen program on their own. All I do is introduce them and then they are librarian for the night. My internship program is a lot of work but the teens are dedicated to it and all of them have enjoyed the experience and are glad they took part in it.

Hello, my name is Adrienne Poulson and I am a Library/ Youth Services Assistant in Republic, Missouri. The branch a work at is one of ten branches in the Springfield-Greene County Library District. This is our first year being awarded the Teen Intern Grant. I think this grant will give our teens in town a chance to get involved with their public library and their community. 

Hi Diane.

In addition to posting the job application on our website, we send it to the local high school librarians and guidance/career counselors. Regular volunteers, who we already have a relationship with, are also invited to apply. We ask for a reference on the application, and include questions about past volunteer experience/experience with kids and why they want to intern at the library. Their answers to these questions give us a pretty good idea of their motivation and enthusiasm for the internship. Our problem has typically been that we get applications from so many great applicants that it is hard to choose. It typically comes down to who is available throughout the summer, and would benefit most from the experience.

Diane Pamel said:

For those of you who have used this grant before, I would love to hear how you recruit your teen helpers.  I want to be able to provide some job readiness skill training but want to get the right hire...

Wow!  That sounds like a wonderful program.  I know I would have students who would be interested in that type of program.  I might have to consider something for the future.  Our summer intern program will be focused on assisting with our Summer Reading Program.  We never seem to have enough hands during the summer and we are looking forward to a teen's perspective for programming.

Lindsey Tomsu said:

Hello! My name is Lindsey Tomsu, and I am the Teen Librarian at the La Vista Public Library in La Vista, Nebraska. While this is my first year receiving the intern grant, this will be the fourth summer of my Teen Advisory Board Teen Internship program. You might have read a bit about it in our article in School Library Journal this past November. http://www.slj.com/2015/11/teens-ya/a-model-internship-program/#_

My program is a TAB-member incentive. It is created as a college-level, 10-week true to life internship that they can put on their scholarship, NHS, college and job applications as real-life practical experience. My library shares a building with a location of Metro Community College and their president is so nice to give us a classroom to use each summer for the internship. The internship itself is broken up into eight units of materials over the ten weeks:

(1)   Introduction to Libraries and Librarianship

(2)   Programming

(3)   Circulation

(4)   Reference

(5)   Collection Development

(6)   Teen Services

(7)   Miscellaneous

(8)   Their Future as a Librarian

Once interns have been selected, they receive an official offer letter in the mail. Their parents read over the expectations of the internship and sign their approval. The interns then receive their “workbook” of materials, which includes a work schedule, an internship expectations guideline sheet, and their unit-by-unit collection of materials (a calendar with due dates, copies of their readings, and assignment packets). The interns meet every Tuesday and Thursday at 8 a.m. Just like a responsible employee they have to “clock in” and be on time. Until 12 p.m. the teens listen to lectures (with presentations), conduct lively discussions, discuss readings they were to complete before class, and complete in-classroom assignments. From 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., the interns break for lunch. From 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., we prep for the afternoon teen program, which then runs from 3:30 until 4:30/5 p.m. We then clean up and the interns break for dinner. At 6 p.m. we begin our evening program. The interns then help clean up that program and leave around 8 p.m.

Over the past three years, I have had seven graduates, both boys and girls, ranging from age 13 to 22. One of the biggest responsibilities the interns do is our Guilty Pleasures Night, which is usually in July. They have to brainstorm, plan, budget, shop, and run the teen program on their own. All I do is introduce them and then they are librarian for the night. My internship program is a lot of work but the teens are dedicated to it and all of them have enjoyed the experience and are glad they took part in it.

Hi, my name is Sonya Harsha and I am the Young Adult Librarian in Algona, IA  This is our first time to receive the Summer Intern Grant.  We are super excited to be able to include a teen as a part of our staff for our Summer Program.  Our intern will receive training in all aspects of working in a library, as well as assist with summer programming.

Hi! My name is April Wallace and I am the director of Pinson Public Library in Pinson, AL. We are using the grant to hire 2 teen interns to help with our summer reading program. Everyone who applies will get an interview so that they can go through the application and interview process. Even if they aren't chosen they will get some constructive feedback to help them on future interviews.

Hi, my name is Chelsea Bedley and I'm the Assistant Director of Youth Services at Kirkwood Public Library. We are thrilled to have received the Teen Intern Grant! It is such an exciting opportunity for our library and the teens in our community. The teens we bring on this summer will create a promotional video for our library from storyboard to filming and editing the final results. We have already received some amazing applications and look forward to meeting them at upcoming interviews. So glad to be a part of this group. I look forward to talking with you all this summer!

Our program has been going really well so far. We brought on three summer reading interns to create, film and edit a promotional video for the library. We sent out information to the schools, promoted the internship on our website, and advertised it through social media. We had a total of 48 applicants! It was amazing to see that much interest in the library. After a tough process of narrowing down candidates we interviewed seven and hired three. 

The interns went through an orientation process, and have learned about different library department offerings, materials, and services that they will promote in the video. They have figured out a storyboard for the film, scheduled out the programs and content they want to include and have begun filming. The interns are averaging 5 hours per week, and will complete a total of 40 hours by the end of their internship. I have been really impressed with their ability to work well together and take direction. They have brought fresh ideas to the table and are collaborative with ideas. I will share more as the filming process continues.

I look forward to hearing more about all of your programs!

Hi. I'm the Teen Services Coordinator at the Addison Public Library. Our interns help run our Free Lunch program, lead volunteers, and plan activities to engage younger children. Our interns have gone above and beyond this summer.  They have already developed an online system for volunteer timesheets and planned weekly themes for activities in our lunch. They are doing an incredible job as role models to our volunteers and learning work skills that will serve them no matter what career path they choose. 

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